Textures and Colors

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There is very little, in my world at least, quite so cool as having my five-year-old son easily recognize songs from local artists or somewhat obscure indie groups when he hears them. And, if he knows the song well enough, he will belt it out with much gusto. I love it and can’t get enough of it. Whether it’s hearing him loudly sing Project 86‘s Illuminate or The Daredevil Christopher Wright‘s The Animal of Choice, it is awesome.

Obviously, I spend a lot of time listening to such music, finding ways to connect others to it, and just thinking about it. Those are the surface elements of this blog. But there is a deeper current running here. What started as a way to promote locally-rooted music has evolved into an ongoing discussion about how music makes us feel. To me, that is one of the most valuable parts of music. It has a strange,  but ultimately  very human, way of connecting us with an artist’s emotions and help us to more fully feel our own. This is a really good thing. Healthy, in fact. So, we talk about this stuff all the time in my house. It’s part of the fabric of the Hudgins household culture.

A few weeks ago, Joshua had his scrap paper out and was working on his own art. Now, I am clearly as biased as any other father would be when appreciating what his child creates. But, I was pretty blown away by what Joshua was putting together. He was using multi-colored paint blotter thingies and “randomly” placing various colors throughout his paper canvas. At first glance, I thought it was just pretty; a fun combination of colors. And then I asked him what he was painting.

His reply: “Your website.” Of course, I was enamored by the fact that he would even think to do that. But, I was also curious, so I asked him to describe what he meant. He couldn’t really do that, which was awesome in and of itself. The best I could gather is that all the colors represented different ways of feeling. I was amazed at how my little boy was able to grasp so well what Tomme Suab is… that it’s not just about music, but about the textures and colors of the music and how those things come together to stimulate emotional response. I was both proud of my little boy and humbled at the same time.

His painting is at the top of this post. Take it in. Enjoy. And, consider how the colors and textures of your favorite musicians have impacted your emotional world.

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