TS10

TS10: Another Mother’s Son

I don’t know Phil Cook, but I wish I did. Considering everything I’ve heard from and of him, he seems like a good dude. I caught the last half of his performance at Eaux Claires this year, and I couldn’t help but smile. I guess that makes sense when the guy has an album entitled People Are My Drug. That may sound like a nice catchy name, but I think it’s likely a reliable indicator of the kind of guy Cook is.

One of the songs from that album is featured on this week’s TS10. It’s called Another Mother’s Son. I read a little about that song on Cook’s website and it immediately resonated with me. If you read my post, Every Son Is My Son, about the slaying of young Jordan Edwards, you would know why. Cook’s song is a heartbreaking (and perhaps a little defiant) anthem proclaiming the value of every mother’s son and highlighting the tragedy of black lives senselessly cut short by a police officer’s gun.

As you listen to this week’s TS10, I invite you to feel deeply. There’s a lot here. I love the premise of Naked GiantsEverybody Thinks They Know… Damn, it sure feels like that sometimes, and I wish we could all admit that, mostly, we don’t “really know.” You have the raw emotion of serpentwithfeet’s invoice, along with two exciting new songs from Matthew Perryman Jones and Big Red Machine respectively.

However, I would invite you to engage especially with the content and feel of Cook’s Another Mother’s Son. Go deep and let yourself feel through the tragic truth there. To help that process, here are the lyrics to the song:

Did you know?

That the moment I first held you in my arms

I held you close and felt your beating heart

Like a hummingbird’s wings

Did you know, son?

There’s a prayer that I offer to the moon

Watching sleep slowly wrap you in its womb

Like a hummingbird’s wings

Heaven keep him safe

May he always find his way

He didn’t make it

He didn’t make it home, it’s like she always feared

Will we whitewash our fences with her tears

Like we always do?

Will we find it?

Will we find another way to empathize?

Will we open up and see it eye to eye

Or will we all run away?

And another one is gone

Another mother’s son is gone away

Police man let his pistol free

Poet ran to write a eulogy

Po’ Mama, all her cries are drowned by sirens

Rifle man calls it liberty

Preacher trusts the Trinity

But only Mama, she holds all that silence

You can find it

You can find it anywhere their laughter lives

Ain’t it sacred as a prayer on your lips

Say no more, say no more

Another one is gone

Another mother’s son is gone away

Police man let his pistol free

Poet ran to write a eulogy

Po’ Mama, all her cries are drowned by sirens

Rifle man calls it liberty

Preacher trusts the Trinity

But only Mama, she holds all that…

SILENCE!    

SILENCE!

SILENCE!

SILENCE!

No more silence! (Everybody)

No more silence! (Everybody)

No more fathers! (Everybody)

No more mothers! (Everybody)

No more daughters! (Everybody)

No more sons! (Everybody)

No more sisters! (Everybody)

No more brothers! (Everybody)

No more daughters! (Everybody)

No more sons! (Everybody)

Anymore!  (No more bodies)

Anymore! (No more bodies)

Never anymore! (No more bodies)

No more bodies

No more bodies

No more bodies

No more bodies

No more bodies

 

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TS10

TS10: Eaux4Pools

Welcome to a special edition of the TS10. It’s special in that there are several strains running through this playlist which carry different kinds of significance. Eaux Claires is this week and I’m excited to partake in that incredible event once again (I’ve undergone something of an evolution in my thinking about the festival over the last couple of years, which I will likely share more about later). With the impending “return to the river,” the playlist kicks off with Bon Iver and The National, a small nod to the creators of Eaux Claires, Justin Vernon and Aaron Desner. J.E. Sunde is also included because of the festival, not because of his involvement, but because in my opinion he really ought to be involved!

Independence Day is also upon us here in the States. I am quite ambivalent about the 4th of July. While I’m grateful for the immense freedom we possess here, I am also aware of the racist and bloody past (and present) we tend to whitewash not only this time of year, but pretty much all the time. As a follower of Jesus, it’s hard for me to be excited about celebrating rebellion from our governing authority (wink wink, Jeff Sessions) and the facilitators of that rebellion who were, by and large, slaveholders and/or proponents of the slavery as well as the subjugation and dehumanizing of indigenous peoples. I find the  4th to be a prime opportunity to grieve and repent, personally.

Based on this approach to July 4th, we have Derek Webb’s King and a Kingdom, an anthem from what has become a functional time-capsule in Webb’s 2005 album, Mockingbird. Even though Webb disavows what he once believed, the truth in this song stands: “My first allegiance is not to a flag, a country, or a man…” Sylvan Esso’s Parad(w/m)e adds a little political commentary regarding current events. Muse’s Uprising is a call to stand up against the bullies. Marvin Gaye invites us to sit at the table, have a conversation, and bring “a little love in here today.” Lastly, Jimi Hendrix’s legendary version of The Star-Spangled Banner closes out this “Americana” aspect of the TS10.

Lastly, I am very pleased to debut a new song from what is quickly becoming one of my favorite bands, LASKA, rooted right here in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. Their new track, Dirty Pools, is creative, a little mesmerizing at times, and rife with anger and pain. Those spill out throughout the song and eventually manifest in a few choice F-bombs at the end (you’ve been warned).

So, yeah, there’s a lot happening in this week’s TS10. So, take a listen and let yourself feel through it all!

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